The Goodbye Crutches Blog

Fishing and Golfing after Ankle Surgery thanks to the iWALK2.0 Hands Free Crutch

Posted by Brooke Williams


Life must go on after Ankle Surgery thanks to the iWALK2.0 Hands Free Crutch  Bob Savage, a civil engineer who works for the state of Connecticut didn’t like the idea of giving up so much of his life to the non-weight bearing way of existing after his ankle surgery. Instead of succumbing to the limitations of crutches, he simply ordered an iWALK2.0. He was amazed by how quickly he got used to the device. “I got the iWALK2.0 yesterday at 11am and now today I can get around everywhere…I just have to be careful!”

Bob had big plans for his new mobility. First, he said, “I am planning on fishing with it soon and even playing golf. I know I can do it.” He was excited about the little things the iWALK2.0 allowed him to do as well. “I can even sit down in a chair and let me iWALK2.0 device rest on a table so my foot can hand in the air without removing the device.”

 

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Topics: Dad recovering, Hands Free Crutch

Gary gets back to his active life. Trades Crutches for the iWALK2.0

Posted by Tom Schwab

Gary gets back to his active life. Trades Crutches for the iWALK2.0


 

When someone receives an injury, crutches, walkers, and wheelchairs seem like the obvious mobility aids.  In fact, they are so common that many doctors and rehabilitation centers do not even know there are other options out there.

Gary was dismayed when his doctor told him that he could not bear any weight on his foot injury.  He was even more depressed about his situation when he was sent home with a hemi-walker and wheelchair.  “I was expected to hop around on one foot with the walker.  I did this for two weeks…not an easy thing to do.”  Gary asked his doctor about other options, but there were no suggestions made.  When Gary returned to his doctor, he saw a pamphlet for GoodbyeCrutches.com in the office and the world of his recovery began to turn around.

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Topics: Dad recovering, Hands Free Crutch

Dad's have to use Crutches in the most Unusual Places

Posted by Tom Schwab

Dad's have to use Crutches in the most Unusual PlacesAs you get used to your life on crutches, you may start to think that being on them to get around is not so bad.  And then, you begin to go back to your everyday life and you hit events in which crutches are not exactly welcome.  Here are some places where crutches might trouble you and how you can get through the experiences.

 

Place #1: Your Child’s Football Game

Not only do you have to hike to the field from the car, but then you have to go up a multitude of steps in order to find a seat.  All that is among many other adults trying to secure their own place on the bleachers.  The first thing you will want to do is ask whomever you go with to drop you as close to the entrance as possible.  The shorter distance you have to walk through the grassy area, the better.  Then, ask a security guard if there is somewhere in the aisle along the main portion of the bleachers you can sit.  Many establishments might have places available for those with a handicap.  Some might even let you sit off to the sidelines on the field itself so you do not have to bother with the stairs.

 

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Topics: Dad recovering

7 Perfect Presents for a Father on Crutches

Posted by Brooke Williams

undefined-018529-editedEvery year you search for a perfect gift for your dad for Father’s Day. This year, the search is even harder. Your dad injured himself and is hobbling around on crutches so in order to show you care, you really want to do something that will stand out during his recovery. Here are a few present ideas that will really touch your dad’s heart and help his recovery at the same time.

 

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Topics: Dad recovering, Gifts

101 Things To Do For a Dad on Crutches.

Posted by Tom Schwab



1. Ask other dads online questions about recovering.
2. Attach a camera to your crutches or head to film things from your perspective.
3. Be adventurous and try a new restaurant.
4. Become a great air guitarist.
5. Become an expert on current events.
6. Become our Facebook friend.
7. Begin a fantasy team.
8. Be thankful that your injury wasn’t worse.
9. Brew your own beer.
10. Build a massive Lego creation.
11. Build a model (plane, train, automobile, etc).
12. Build something using only toothpicks.
13. Buy a lottery ticket.
14. Buy some new tools online.
15. Catch up on some Bible reading and work on memorizing.
16. Check to see if you can get a temporary handicap sticker.
17. Clean your gun while waiting for your teenage daughter’s date to come over.
18. Count how many licks it takes to get to the center of a Tootsie Roll Pop.
19. Create your own comic strip.
20. Design and create a birdhouse for your kids.
21. Do brain teasers.
22. Doodle.
23. Draw cartoons for your kids using an online tutorial.
24. Drive somewhere you’ve never been before.
25. Fill in your family tree/trace your genealogy.
26. Find an interesting documentary to watch.
27. Find blogs about dads on crutches.

28. Find out how much your old toys are worth online. forget crutches at work, real men use a knee scooter
29. Fish off a dock.
30. Forget crutches, get a modern crutch alternative like a knee scooter.
31. Fly or drive a remote controlled vehicle.
32. Get a book about the constellations and try to find them at night.
33. Get a supportive/comfortable pair of shoes for your good foot.
34. Get your favorite childhood TV series and watch the whole thing.
35. Glue a quarter to the floor and see how many people try to pick it up.
36. Go on a virtual tour.
37. Go through your paperwork and shred the old stuff.
38. Go to a movie in the middle of the day so you have the whole theater to yourself.
39. Have your kids or wife decorate your cast or crutches.
40. Have your kids rip your music off your CDs for you (feel free to ask them what this means first…I had to).
41. “Hire” your kids as “personal assistants”.
42. Host a Euchre tournament.
43. If you are a smoker: quit or cut down to help improve healing time.
44. Impress your kids by reading some of their favorite books.
45. Introduce your kids to your favorite movies when you were their age.
46. Join an online community for other dads on crutches.
47. Leatherwork: make a wallet or belt.
48. Learn origami.
49. Learn to ask for help.
50. Learn to whittle.
51. Learn to play the guitar.
52. Listen to an audio book.
53. Listen to your body and tell your doctor about anything unusual.
54. Look for funny YouTube videos.
55. Look up what happened in history on the day you were born.
56. Laugh at yourself (they say it’s the best medicine and kinder than laughing at others).
57. Make a list of 25 random things about yourself and see how many your kids (or wife!) knew.
58. Make a time capsule with your family.
59. Make paper airplanes.
60. Master the Rubiks cube.
61. Move any loose rugs, cords, or furniture that might get in your way.
62. Pester your wife.
63. Play hockey using your crutches as a stick and a tennis ball as a puck.
64. Play Wii or video games.
65. Play with your kids toys while they’re at school.
66. Practice juggling.
67. Practice knot tying.
68. Put a mirror, chair and TV tray next to each other for shaving.
69. Put on a puppet show for your kids.
70. Randomly pick a word out of the dictionary and use it as much as possible.
71. Read magazines about your favorite hobbies.
72. Remind your wife about the “for better or worse, in sickness and in health” part.
73. Rent a TV series you’ve always wanted to watch.
74. Review your family budget and see what changes can be made.
75. Roll loose change you find around the house.
76. Sculpt something out of tin foil.
77. See how many circles your cat (or kid) will run trying to catch a laser.
78. Send a thank you note to your doctor for fixing you.
79. Share tips you’ve learned about being a dad on crutches.
80. Share your baseball cards with your kids and look up their value.
81. Shoot rubber bands at people.
82. Sign up to get paid to critique web sites.
83. Surprise your wife by writing out the family Christmas cards.
84. Take an online class.
85. Take your family to an amusement park and you will all get to jump to the front of the line.
86. Teach your kids how to play paper football.
87. Think up some really good April Fools pranks to pull.
88. Turn your TV on and off with your crutch if your remote is broken.
89. Tutor a student in your favorite subject.
90. Use the extra time to pray for people.
91. Use your crutches to get your kid’s ball out of the tree.
92. Use your crutch to scratch your back.
93. Use your non-dominant hand for the day.
94. Watch all those movies you never have time to see.
95. Watch Saturday morning cartoons with your kids and complain about how “they just don’t make them like they used to”.
96. Watch your kids try to kiss their elbow.
97. Workout your upper body muscles.
98. Write down all the things you have to be thankful for.
99. Write down/record memories of your children for them to have years from now.
100. Write out a bucket list.
101. Help us with other ideas for our list!

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Topics: Tips, Dad recovering

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